> Ask the expert: New treatments in metastatic breast cancer

Ask the expert: New treatments in metastatic breast cancer

Date and Time

Wed, Dec 16, 2020 7:00 pm to 7:45 pm ET

Location

Virtual

Watch session recording

Event details

Living Beyond Breast Cancer knows it is a priority for those diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer to have the most current information on new treatments available, as well as treatments currently in development. Having the most up-to-date information increases knowledge of what questions to ask your healthcare provider and promotes confidence in making treatment decisions.

In this Ask the Expert webinar, Oncologist, Nancy U. Lin, MD gives an update on new and emerging therapies for all subtypes of metastatic breast cancer from her participation in SABCS 2020. The brief update is followed by an extended Q&A with the virtual audience.

Date and Time

Wed, Dec 16, 2020 7:00 pm to 7:45 pm ET

Location

Virtual

Watch session recording
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About our expert

Nancy U. Lin, MD

Nancy U. Lin, MD, is the associate chief director of the division of breast oncology and director of the metastatic breast cancer program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Her research is focused upon developing new treatments for patients with metastatic breast cancer and in understanding mechanisms of therapeutic resistance.

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Moderated by:

Janine E. Guglielmino, MA

Vice President, Mission Delivery

Janine oversees the implementation of our programs, publications and research initiatives. In this role, she contributes to the content and design of all core LBBC activities. She leads needs assessments and evaluative activities that ensure the high quality of existing and future programming.

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Upcoming Events

Ask the expert: Metastatic breast cancer

Wed, Dec 14, 2022

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Thriving Together: 2023 Conference on Metastatic Breast Cancer

Fri, Apr 28, 2023

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