> The role of spirituality in cancer care: A framework for providers

The role of spirituality in cancer care: A framework for providers

Date and Time

Fri, Sep 23, 2022 1:00 pm to 2:15 pm ET

Location

Virtual

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Event details

Spiritual care is a critical element of patient care, but guiding breast cancer patients who have different faiths and beliefs can feel challenging for providers. How can healthcare providers assist breast cancer patients in decision making across the continuum of care while incorporating patients’ spiritual beliefs?

To address this question and provide a framework for providers to understand and incorporate their patients’ spiritual beliefs, Living Beyond Breast Cancer and Breast Cancer Resource Center (BCRC) have partnered for an exciting new webinar.

During the program, Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH, FAAHPM, and Rev. Dr. Saneta Maiko, PhD, MS, BCC, addressed and answered audience questions about:

  • The role of spirituality in coping with breast cancer
  • Patients’ diverse perspectives on spirituality and its meaning in their breast cancer experience
  • The connection between spirituality and healthcare
  • Patient-centered spiritual care
  • How to talk with patients about spirituality and connect them to resources for spiritual care
  • The role of unique spirituality practices that impact treatment

Please note: Contact hours, CEs, and certificates of participation are available only to those who joined the live program on 09/23/2022.

Date and Time

Fri, Sep 23, 2022 1:00 pm to 2:15 pm ET

Location

Virtual

Watch recording

View session resources

 

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About our speakers

Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH, FAAHPM

Tracy Balboni, MD, MPH, FAAHPM, holds degrees from Stanford University, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard School of Public Health. She is board certified in both radiation oncology and palliative medicine. Dr. Balboni currently serves as professor of radiation oncology at Harvard Medical School and as program director of the Harvard Radiation Oncology Program. She also co-leads the Initiative on Health, Religion, and Spirituality at Harvard.

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Saneta Maiko, PhD, MS, BCC

Saneta Maiko, PhD, MS, BCC, is a faculty member of Indiana University Health’s Dan Evans Center for Spiritual and Religious Values. His clinical research investigates the role of spirituality and religion on the emotional and spiritual wellbeing of outpatient metastatic cancer patients and caregivers.

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3 Tier Sponsors

This program is brought to you in partnership with:

Breast Cancer Resource Center (BCRC) is a community-based non-profit serving Central Texans impacted by breast cancer. Since its founding in 1995, BCRC is proud to take a leadership role in providing resources that meet the physical, mental, social, and psychological needs of local breast cancer clients and their families. Visit bcrc.org for more information.

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*This nursing continuing professional development activity was approved by the Ohio Nurses Association, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. (OBN-001-91)

*This program is Approved by the National Association of Social Workers (Approval # 886556304-4454) for 1 continuing education contact hours.

*Certificates of participation will be available for providers of other disciplines upon request through the evaluation process.

This webinar is supported by the Grant or Cooperative Agreement Numbers 1 NU58DP006672 and NU58DP006675-01-00, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Department of Health and Human Services.

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