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Young Women's Initiative

Specific resources to meet the needs of those diagnosed with breast cancer before age 45.

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Living Beyond Breast Cancer’s Young Women’s Initiative provides resources tailored to meet the specific needs of those diagnosed with breast cancer before age 45.

We know that the psychosocial and medical concerns are different than those of women diagnosed over age 45, and we are dedicated to providing age-appropriate information and resources specific to the needs of young women.

Through the Young Women’s Initiative, we offer webinars, conference sessions, publications, and advocacy trainings tailored to young women. We curate the latest breast cancer research on young women, profile young women on our blog, and work with young women affected by breast cancer to produce videos about health topics relevant to young women.

The Young Women’s Initiative began in 2011 and is funded through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Related resources

Early menopause

08/26/22 | BY: Ann Honebrink

If you are premenopausal or perimenopausal, breast cancer treatments — including surgery to remove ovaries, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapy — may cause your menstrual periods to stop for a while or, in some cases, permanently.

Read More | 9 Min. Read |

Young Women

05/04/22 | BY: Don S. Dizon

If you’re a woman diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 45, your medical and emotional concerns may be very different than those of women who are diagnosed when they are older. Body image, relationships, career, intimacy, fertility, and parenting are just some of the issues and life areas that can bring up questions for you.

Read More |

Ovarian suppression

11/05/19

Ovarian suppression is surgery, radiation therapy or medicine that is used in premenopausal women to stop the ovaries from working.

Read More | 4 Min. Read

Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists

10/07/19 | BY: H. Irene Su

The gonadotropin releasing hormone agonists, or GnRH agonists, are a class of injectable medicines offered to pre- and perimenopausal women with breast cancer in order to temporarily suppress, or slow, ovarian function.

Read More | 5 Min. Read

Making decisions about protecting your fertility

09/06/19 | BY: H. Irene Su

You might not be thinking about having a family at the time of your diagnosis, but that’s the best time to talk with your partner, family, and healthcare team about future fertility.

Read More | 6 Min. Read

Protecting your fertility during treatment

08/06/19 | BY: H. Irene Su

If you are premenopausal (still having menstrual periods), breast cancer treatments such as chemotherapy and hormonal therapy can affect your fertility. This may make it harder to become pregnant after treatment ends.

Read More | 6 Min. Read

Birth control and breast cancer

08/05/19 | BY: H. Irene Su

If you were not in menopause before your breast cancer diagnosis and you are sexually active, it’s important to discuss birth control, or contraception, with your doctor. During treatment, you should not become pregnant. Early in pregnancy, chemotherapy and hormonal therapy can harm a fetus and lead to birth defects.

Read More | 5 Min. Read

Am I in menopause

08/05/19 | BY: H. Irene Su

Women affected by breast cancer may be premenopausal or perimenopausal before diagnosis. Learn more about early menopause, and other ways that you may be affected.

Read More | 5 Min. Read

Fertility treatment options

08/01/19 | BY: Kristin Smith

A breast cancer diagnosis can force you to think about the future sooner than you expect. We can help you learn about options to preserve fertility. Use our chart as a starting point to talk with your healthcare provider about what is important to you for your future.

Caring for your mental health

09/25/17 | BY: Sabitha Pillai-Friedman

Most parents believe that they should put their children’s needs and well-being above their own. But self-care, taking care of yourself and your mental health, will better equip you to give your kids support. And self-care will help you manage your physical and emotional needs as well.

Read More | 12 Min. Read
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